AS Research Programs
The Autism Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is a network of 8-13 medical centers that work together to carry out clinical trials for autism. The centers in the network work collaboratively to support trials by recruiting children, providing clinical expertise and following the protocols for each trial (multi-site, single protocol trial). Since the sites in the network share uniform practices for data collection, assessment training, and study methods, clinical trials are greatly expedited. The goal of the network is to rapidly screen new and promising compounds and other interventions and provide pilot data for larger multi-center federally funded trials. Possible interventions include pharmaceuticals (new compounds and off-label drugs), neutraceuticals (e.g. vitamins, minerals, fatty-acid supplements) and behavioral treatments (alone or in combination with pharmacologic treatments).

For more information, please visit: www.autismspeaks.org/science/programs/ctn.



The Autism Treatment Network (ATN) is a network of treatment and clinical care centers dedicated to improving medical care for children and adolescents with autism. The ATN seeks to fulfill its goal of improving medical treatment by establishing standards of clinical care based on clinical research and shared clinical practice. The ATN is dedicated to establishing these standards of care for autism in the medical community through open research collaboration, trainee mentorship, medical education and participation in conferences. The ATN is further committed to improving insurance reimbursement for autism-specific treatments to increase accessibility to these treatments community-wide.

For more information, please visit: www.autismspeaks.org/science/programs/atn.



The Autism Tissue Program (ATP) was established in 1998 to create a centralized source of brain tissue and associated clinical data from individuals with ASD and their families. Brain tissue offers researchers a way to directly examine underlying processes in the brain. Without this precious resource, the basic understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this disorder is not possible. Studying brain tissue allows researchers to a) better understand the underlying biological mechanisms associated with autism; b) develop treatment targets; and c) develop better biomarkers. The ATP participates in a nationwide campaign to help families understand the importance of brain tissue donation. Because autism has been deemed the most heritable of the neurodevelopmental disorders, all family members are encouraged to register for donation. Researchers also need brain tissue from neurotypical controls, i.e. people who are neither autistic nor related to people with autism, to compare with tissue from affected individuals and their family members.

For more information, please visit: www.autismtissueprogram.org.



The Interactive Autism Network (IAN) is a program of Kennedy Krieger Institute that is sponsored by Autism Speaks. Families are able to participate in research by filling out online questionnaires about themselves and their families.

For more information, please visit www.ianresearch.org.